GENERAL LEGAL COUNCIL

On attainment of independence, the government saw the need to provide local facilities for legal education in Ghana. It therefore enacted the Legal practitioners, Act 1958 which created the General legal council with general responsibility for the training of lawyers in

GHANA, AMONG OTHER GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The legal profession embraces two categories of persons. The first category consists of those who are formally enrolled as lawyers at the end of their training in the school. This category includes judges, lawyers who practice as advocates in the court and lawyers who work outside the courts in legal chambers, Government departments, non-governmental organization and as teachers of law.

The second category is the paralegal personnel who work in the chambers of legal practitioners and in legal department of various organizations. These comprise court clerks, registrars and other administrative staff of the court, and they are as essential to the legal profession as nurses are to the medical profession.

The vision of Law School is to become a centre of excellence in Africa and the world for professional legal training and research. The school at present is non-residential.

OBJECTIVES OF LEGAL EDUCATION

The main objectives of the Ghana School of Law have been:

Training of suitable persons to become professional lawyers i.e. Solicitors, barristers, magistrates, judges and academic lawyers.

  • Pupil age of newly enrolled lawyers.
  • Provision of facilities to enable professional lawyers to specialize in various areas of the law.
  • Training personnel designated as paralegals to assist lawyers in chambers and the court.
  •  Provision of continuing legal education for professional lawyers and paralegals.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE STATE OF GHANA

The Ghana School of Law is helping in the delivery and administration of justice through training of lawyers as a vehicular means for the strengthening of the rule of law and democratic governance. The School is an investment for the state in the light of the fact that if it had not existed, Ghana would have had to train its lawyers abroad which would have been at a great expense to the state. In addition, lecturers undertake research and write books for students and the general populace, which helps in the propagation and dissemination of knowledge.